Playing the Drums

Playing the Drums

Advantages and Disadvantages of Electric Drums vs. Acoustic Drums

Playing the Drums
Both types of drum kits have their specialized uses and distinct advantages over the other but it all depends on what you intend to use the drum kit for and how serious you are with your drumming.
Here is a list of the advantages and disadvantages of each drum kit which you can use to help decide what you’re going to buy.
The Electric Drum Kit
Advantages
Probably the most important advantage an electric drum kit has is the ability to practice with ear phones or turn down the volume of the drums, to avoid noise problems. This makes the electric drum kit suitable for apartments or houses with noise-sensitive neighbors.
Most electric drum kits have built-in tools for practice such as metronomes and multiple drum kit sounds which enable the drummer to experiment with their sound and playing styles. This is useful for learning how to play the drums.
Most mid-range electric kits are cheaper than most mid-range acoustic kits, especially when you consider having to purchase cymbals and stands for acoustic kits.
You will never have to worry about tuning an electronic drum kit.
Electric kits occupy less floor space than most acoustic drum sets so they can fit inside small rooms or into small stages.
Disadvantages
The biggest disadvantage of electric kits is that they don’t feel or sound the same as an acoustic drum kit. The technology is improving but there is still no substitute for the sound of real drums, cymbals and hi-hats.
Maintenance is expensive because electric drum kits will eventually break down and will need individual parts replaced such as new drum pads, clamps, etc.
Some electric drum kits have limited positioning options. For example, drums may not be set up at required heights due to limiting pad arms or rack.
The Acoustic Drum Kit
Advantages
With an acoustic kit the drummer can play with great feel and touch. Cymbal washes are possible, unlike most electric drum kits.
Acoustic drums allow the drummer to learn and perform drum rolls, buzz rolls, cymbal swells, hi-hat technique and cross stick to a better and more realistic level than the electric drum kit.
The positioning of an acoustic kit are superior allowing angles and heights of drums to be placed where you want to due to advanced adjustable stands.
Disadvantages
A acoustic drum kit is loud and noisy, but drum silencer pads can be used to reduce the volume drastically. However, if you do so, the feel and sound of the drums are drastically reduced.
Drums will need their heads replaced occasionally and this can be quite expensive.
Acoustic drums need to be tuned, and this can be difficult to do properly by amateurs.
There is a real risk of suffering hearing damage, so ear plugs may have to be worn by the drummer.
Drum kits can be big and heavy and so requires space and patience when setting up or breaking down.
Conclusion
The choice of what type to buy depends on just one factor ? noise. If noise is a problem, than the quieter electric kit is advisable.
Also, for beginners, electric kits are advisable because of the cheap price, as well as the built-in learning tools that are included during purchase.
If you play many gigs and are a professional drummer, there is no substitute for an acoustic kit. If it is too loud, one can use drum mutes to lessen the noise, although the performance will be affected.

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